Four Apollo 11 Artifacts You Can See at Cincinnati Museum Center

Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission highlights the items that made a trip to the moon possible for our astronauts.
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Fifty years after man first set foot on the moon, Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission lands in the Queen City, showcasing artifacts that made the historic 953,000-mile journey possible. Check out some of the highlights below and see them for yourself at the Cincinnati Museum Center through February 17.

Photograph by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institute

The Command Module Columbia
This capsule—on display away from the National Air and Space Museum for the first time since 1976—was the only part of the Apollo 11 spacecraft to return intact to Earth. It was Neil Armstrong’s, Buzz Aldrin’s, and Michael Collins’s home for most of the mission.


Photograph by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institute

Aldrin’s Space Visor
This is the space helmet that hid Aldrin’s smile while he took his first steps on the moon. It provided protection from everything from physical impact to ultraviolet and infrared light.


Photograph by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institute

Aldrin’s Space Gloves
These “extra-vehicular” gloves were specifically made for Aldrin (they were molded from a cast of his hands!) to wear while he explored the moon’s surface with Armstrong.


Photograph by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institute

Rucksack No. 1, Survival Kit
This is one of two survival kits provided for the lunar-landing mission in 1969. This kit held equipment that would allow the crew to survive for up to 48 hours after returning to Earth.

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