Five Well-Being Boosters

Once in a while, we all need a little pick-me-up. Try these tips and tricks for getting yourself back on track.

Once in a while, we all need a little pick-me-up. If you’re a little stuck and looking for something to get you out of your rut, be kind to yourself and try one of these five options.

A THERAPY FLOAT

Illustration by Emi Villavicencio

Patients floating in the salt water chambers at Think Tank Flotation in Newport are in just 10 inches of skin-temperature water. The chamber blocks outside sound and light, relaxing every joint and muscle and helping those with PTSD, addiction, and physical injuries. 521 Monmouth St., Newport


WRITE IT DOWN

Illustration by Emi Villavicencio

Journal writing is one way to express ourselves in a judgment-free space, providing a means to grieve, deal with anxiety, and think positively. “When I journal, I’m not writing for anyone but myself,” says Dani McClain, the Cincinnati Public Library’s writer-in-residence, on her blog. “I’m not as worried about whether I’m being clear or relatable.”


LOVE A PLANT

Illustration by Emi Villavicencio

By nurturing a plant you also nurture yourself, says Erikka Gray, co-owner of Pause Cincinnati in Corryville. “Plants help us step away from technology and have something to actively take care of,” she says. “And they help purify the air.” Gray suggests easy-to-care-for varieties like spider plants and peace lilies. 2908 Short Vine St., Corryville


YOUR NOSE KNOWS

Illustration by Emi Villavicencio

Aromatherapy is the use of aromatic plant extracts to boost well-being by inhaling (like a candle) or applying directly to the body (like a massage oil) to help manage pain, reduce stress and anxiety, improve digestion, and even fight bacteria. “We know smell and memory are really tied together,” says Erikka Gray, “so pick a scent that reminds you of a more peaceful time.”


GET IT TOGETHER

Illustration by Emi Villavicencio

Not only does disorganization stress us out, but studies have also shown that mess distracts us and makes us less productive. In fact, evidence suggests that clutter can increase our levels of the stress hormone cortisol. When in doubt, think, What would Marie Kondo do?

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