Neighborhood Spotlight: Newport

A renaissance continues across the river, with a slew of new haunts near Monmouth Street.
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1. Artifact
In its bright, spacious gallery, Artifact showcases the diverse work of eight resident artists who rent individual studios from co-owner Matt Meyung. Opened in 2015, the space is filled with traditional oil paintings as well as wood carvings, eclectic jewelry, and sculptures. Check out Meyung’s work—paintings on reclaimed wood and handmade furniture—in the gallery and across the street: He constructed the tables, chairs, shelves, and bar backsplash for neighboring restaurant 27 Bar + Kitchen. 114 E. Eighth St., artifactnky.com

Artifact

Photograph by Devyn Glista

Artifact

Photograph by Devyn Glista


2. Analog
Sit down and slow down at Analog, Carabello Coffee’s new slow bar. At the cozy seven-seat counter, baristas experiment with brew methods and sling signature coffee drinks from a meticulously curated menu that changes monthly. “[We] build things from the ground up, with the intention of connecting people to the process behind the coffee,” says owner Justin Carabello. Expect to leave with a more educated palate and a buzz. 107 E. Ninth St., carabellocoffee.com

Analog, Carabello Coffee’s new slow bar.

Photograph by Devyn Glista


3. Wooden Cask Brewing Company
You won’t find many sours or experimental IPAs at Wooden Cask Brewing Company, which opened in 2016. Here, Irish, Scottish, and English-style beers still reign. “What we focus on are well-balanced, easy-drinking beers,” says owner Randy Schiltz, former co-owner of Rivertown Brewery. For a rich, flavorful ale, try the Scottish Stout (on nitro!) or opt for the Kentucky Farmhand, a wheat ale with just a hint of citrus. Trouble deciding? A flight of four generous pours is only $7. 629 York St., woodencask.com

4. Seventh Street Gifts
Awaken the senses with a visit to Seventh Street Gifts, where owner Carisa Hund-Bunten’s handmade body soaps, all-natural lotions, and mixed-to-order essential oils fill the tiny shop with an invigorating blend of fragrances. In addition to selling loose teas, incense, crystals, and salt lamps, the store, which opened in 1999, offers tarot readings on Thursdays and aura portraits on Fridays. “We purvey only the best and positive intentions for good change and enlightenment,” Hund-Bunten says. Namaste. 114 E. Seventh St., seventhstreetgifts.com

5. Dresser Up
Filled to the brim with vintage finds, Dresser Up is practically spilling over with once-loved furniture and decor that have found new life. “You can take a quality piece that’s a little dated and reinvent it,” says owner Wendy Critcher. Critcher—who also co-owns The Turn, a vintage shop and event space next door that skews decidedly Mid-Century Modern—carries several lines of chalk-based furniture paint, so “you can paint that piece that grandma had and make it truly yours.” 911 Monmouth St., dresserupvintage.com

Dresser Up

Photograph by Devyn Glista


27 Bar + Kitchen

Photograph by Devyn Glista

6. 27 Bar + Kitchen
It’s only been open a year, but it has established a few mainstays on its Southern-leaning menu. Try New Orleans-style shrimp and grits or Cincinnati-inspired goetta poutine, and wash it down with a specialty cocktail. Their Bloody Mary is made with house brine and jalapeño-infused vodka. 720 Monmouth St., 27bar.kitchen


Street Smarts
Before Newport was known for its levee, aquarium, and spirited Hofbräuhaus, it had a different reputation. It’s the original Sin City. In the 1920s and 1930s, Newport was a popular hangout and hideaway for bootlegging, gambling gangsters. John T. Thompson, the U.S. Army officer who invented the infamous Tommy Gun, even hails from Newport. Las Vegas? Fuhgeddaboudit

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