Farm Fresh: Summer 2015 Farmers’ Market Guide

Sweet corn! Juicy tomatoes! Cool Cukes! Power Greens! Where to find the best local produce, from market to table.
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North
Deerfield Farmers’ Market
Looking for green smoothies? Try again. Sweet baked goods? Only if you’re lucky. Heirloom greens and grass-fed meats? Now you’re talking. Deerfield Township’s market, located in the Kingswood Park lot, offers products from upwards of a dozen different family-owned farms and a few cottage businesses each Saturday.

Deerfield Farmers' Market
Deerfield Farmers’ Market

Photograph by Jonathan Willis

Deerfield Farmers' Market
Deerfield Farmers’ Market

Photograph by Jonathan Willis

Grab a mesclun salad mix from Guy and Sandy Ashmore’s That Guy’s Family Farm—it will knock the stems off of iceberg and Romaine—and while you’re at it, spruce up the kitchen table with a hand-tied bouquet from their daughter Nellie’s That Girl’s Flowers tent. Pair those greens with lean, grass-fed beef from Cook’s Organic Farm; it makes for a properly juicy burger. After which you’ll need to clean up, so stop by Honey Sweetie Acres for all-natural soap and lotion made from the milk of Nigerian Dwarf goats. Be advised, the popular market may be scheduled to run until noon, but some tents close up shop an hour before that. May–October, Saturdays, 9 am–noon, Kingswood Park; November–April, Every third  Saturday, 10–11 am, Kingswood Park, deerfieldfarmersmarket.com


Wyoming Farmers’ Market

If it’s bells and whistles you seek, then try another neighborhood. The charming community of Wyoming—a local repository of both Victorian and mid-century mod architecture—has the simple little farmers’ market you didn’t know you needed. Parked off the main drag of Wyoming Avenue are tents and trucks harboring a well-curated batch of fresh produce, prepared food, and meat and dairy. Stop by Oxford-based 5 Oaks Organics for greens, herbs, and flowers, and pick up a gluten-free loaf from Elephant Bread. If you’re there on the first Tuesday of the month, hit up Donna’s Gourmet Cookies for a famous chocolate chip—if not, get your fix at Wyoming Pastry Shop on your way out of town. May—October: Tuesdays , 3–7 pm, Wyoming Ave. at Oak on the Village Green; Winter Market: Preorders only, details at wyomingfarmersmarket.net

 

Northeast
Loveland Farmers’ Market
If you want Blue Oven bread, you better arrive early or be prepared to wait in line. Other than that, both the quality and quantity of vendors, coupled with the easy-going atmosphere, makes the Loveland Farmers’ Market one of the city’s more relaxing and enjoyable spots to shop sustainably. There are roughly 40 vendors any given week, including Farm Beach Bethel, Brocato’s Italian Market, Grateful Grahams, Summuh hummus, Can-du Farm, Angie’s Malaysian Satay & Sauces, and Streetpops—the last strategically stationed beside that ever-growing line for Blue Oven Bakery. There’s even a Kids’ Patch booth and a guitarist playing silly ABC songs to keep the littles occupied while you grab a much-needed iced coffee from Carabello. And with places such as Smoker EZ BBQ slinging hot pulled pork and chicken sandwiches on-site, you can knock out dinner and shopping all at once. May–October: Tuesdays, 3–7 pm, 897 Loveland Madeira Rd.; November–April: Tuesdays, 3:30–6:30 pm, Prince of Peace Lutheran, lovelandfm.com

 

Central
Northside Farmers’ Market
A Venn diagram of Northside would be drawn thusly: One part hipster Brooklyn, one part hippie commune. And in the overlapping middle is Northside Farmers’ Market. Artisanal popsicles? Free yoga? Check and check.

Northside Farmers' Market
Northside Farmers’ Market

Photograph by Ryan Kurtz

Northside Farmers' Market
Northside Farmers’ Market

Photograph by Ryan Kurtz

Get there early to snag a spot in the Blue Oven Bakery or Shadeau Breads lines, and while you’re at it pick up a mushroom growing kit from Probasco Farm. We’re pretty sure that the fresh-made sourdough doughnuts from AIM Specialty will eventually bring about world peace. No cash? No problem, dude! Exchange $5 for a token that every vendor accepts and that will never expire (within reason, guys). May–October: Wednesdays, 4 pm–7 pm, Hoffner Park, 4101 Hamilton Ave.; November–April: Wednesdays, 4 pm–7 pm, North Presbyterian Church, 4222 Hamilton Ave.,  northsidefm.org


Findlay Market
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, there were nine public markets operating in Cincinnati. Findlay Market, located in historic Over-the-Rhine, is the only original urban market still in operation, built on land gifted to the city from the estate of General James Findlay and his wife Jane in 1852.

Findlay Market
Findlay Market

Photograph by Ryan Kurtz

Findlay Market
Findlay Market

Photograph by Ryan Kurtz

With 40 year-round, full-time vendors and more than 100 on weekends—selling everything from small batch beeswax candles to bean-to-bar artisanal chocolate and heirloom cherry tomato plants—the thriving strip between Elm and Race has ridden out the vicissitudes of urban life to become the crown jewel of open-air markets. While lunchtime visitors crowd Pho Lang Thang, Velvet Smoke BBQ, and Areti’s Gyros for budget-friendly global eats, director Karen Kahle is committed to keeping plenty of fresh food and sundries available for all demographics. “What people love about public markets is the diversity of merchants as well as shoppers,” she says. “We’re committed to maintaining that even as the neighborhood changes.” Year-round: Tuesday–Friday, 9 am–6 pm; Saturday, 8 am–6 pm; Sunday, 10 am–4 pm, although a few merchants open on Monday, findlaymarket.org

 

East
Milford Farmers’ Market
Small but mighty sums up the vibe at the market in this verdant eastern suburb—39 years and still going strong. Market manager Donna Kluba is devoted to the producer-only model—all items must be grown by the individual farm or produced by the stall owner— with the goal of supporting farmers from rural areas in Clermont, Brown, and Highland counties. While only 10–13 vendors regularly sell at this seasonal Saturday market, the quality is superb. Don’t miss the eggs, berries, popcorn, and herbs from Hetterick Farms, or the cabbage and snow peas from Pennington’s Produce. We also snagged scones from Flour Power Baking and topped them with lovely plum jam from Shelly’s Jams and Jellies. “We have plenty of vegetable growers,” explains Kluba. “But we’re always trying to fill in gaps. I’d like to find a bread maker, and someone who specializes in fruit.” Either way, we’ll continue to make this a regular Saturday stop. June–November: Saturdays, 10 am–2 pm; Tuesdays, 2–5:30 pm; Wednesdays, 2–5 pm, Milford Shopping Center, milfordfarmersmarket.com


Madeira Farmers’ Market

Madeira’s farmers’ market just feels like its environs: tidy, picturesque, social. Kids, sucking on Streetpops frozen treats, hang out while their wagon-pulling moms catch up with neighbors.

CM_AUG15_FEATURE_Mad1_webOn pleasant afternoons, the crew from Turner Farm in Indian Hill drives their Clydesdale hitch up Camargo Road hauling the day’s offerings, parking the horses in the shade (and putting the farm in farmers’ market). Madeira boasts a full-on assortment of growers, producers, and artisans: Keep an eye out for the late-summer sweet corn at Lobenstein Farm’s stand and for the all-too-short honeycrisp apple season at Backyard Orchards. Flavors from around the globe somehow make their way here: Czech pastries, Bavarian pretzels, Greek olive oil, Eastern European pickles. The wood smoke wafting above Fireside Pizza and Velvet Smoke BBQ will give you a serious case of the hungries, so if you’re shopping on an empty stomach, consider yourself warned. May–September: Thursdays, 3:30–7 pm, downtown Madeira; Winter market: Thursdays, 3:30–6 pm, indoors at Silverwood Presbyterian Church, madeirafarmersmarket.com


Hyde Park Farmers’ Market

Now in its 11th year, the Hyde Park Farmers’ Market emerged in its full glory in 2012 when it moved from a bank parking lot to the main square. Stalls for nearly 40 vendors line the tree-shaded block in a scene that’s about as bucolic-Midwestern as you can get.

Hyde Park Farmers' Market
Hyde Park Farmers’ Market

Photograph by Ryan Kurtz

You’ll find everything you need for a week’s worth of dinners, from grill-ready Owl Creek bison burgers to Brocato’s fresh pasta and sauces, plus a bouquet of Hazelfield Farm flowers to grace your table. Grab an espresso from La Terza and a Taste of Belgium waffle for the caffeine-and-sugar-buzz to keep you going. Fresh produce is abundant all season long, from spring greens and garlic scapes to fall apples and squash. Timing is everything here, though—10:30 a.m. seems to be the sweet spot. Arrive too early and you will face long lines for Blue Oven Bakery; too late, and many vendors are sold out. May–October: Sundays, 9:30 am–1:30 pm, on Hyde Park Square; Winter market: Sundays, 10 am–1 pm, indoors at Clark Montessori, hydeparkfarmersmarket.com


Anderson Farmers’ Market

It’s always a delight to discover new-to-you vendors at a farmers’ market you haven’t visited before. Tucked behind the township’s main shopping center at the Anderson Center Station Metro depot (enter off of Five Mile Road), the Anderson Farmers’ Market has a cool mix of sellers, mostly smaller farmers and producers who aren’t on the lineup at larger markets like Hyde Park and Findlay. Be sure to check out The Pickled Pig, where chef Gary Leybman, a native of Belarus, offers up pleasantly puckery kraut and kimchee. Anne Schlegel’s home-baked goods are as beautiful as they are tasty. And the summer squash pizza crust from White Oak Valley Farm is worth a try; a fellow market vendor wholeheartedly endorsed its sheer awesomeness. Shadeau Breads is also a welcome presence; do your tastebuds a favor and take home a loaf of their sliced ciabatta and a brick of Meadow Maid’s Ohio cheddar to whip up a killer locavore grilled cheese. Late May–October: Saturdays, 9 am–1 pm, outdoors at Anderson Center Station; Early April–
late May, October & November: Saturdays 9:30 am–12:30 pm, indoors at Anderson Center Station, andersonfarmersmarket.org

 

West
Lettuce Eat Well Farmers’ Market
Lettuce Eat Well is not the picturesque farmers’ market you see in your mind’s eye, with young couples trailing behind leashed dogs in a bustling town square. It’s just four or five tables in a small room of Cheviot United Methodist; if you bump into someone you know, it will happen quite literally. But the small-town vibe does have its pluses. Vendors know their clientele by name and know what they like to buy. Sign up for the weekly e-mail chain that updates regulars on availability and offers pre-ordering. And while the dearth of tables makes for smaller selections, the market is not lacking in vendors: bread from Sixteen Bricks; oils from Mt. Kofinas; honey from Bee Haven; eggs, whole chickens, and produce from Honey Tree Acres Farm & Gardens; and jams, cheese, and pie from Angela’s Homemade Pies are all available. Pro Tip: Take advantage of the pre-order process. Best of all: no long lines! May–October: Fridays, 3–7 pm, Cheviot United Methodist; November–April, Fridays, hours vary, Cheviot United Methodist, lewfm.org


College Hill Farm Market

A parade of kids in homemade crowns snakes past shoppers in the spacious parking lot, and the place is alive with banners, balloons, and socializing. The volunteer-run operation got started 14 years ago when the local Kroger closed. Among the regulars: Our Harvest (the ever-expanding farm co-op based in College Hill); Back Acres Farm from Georgetown (great eggs); and “Grampa” Cliff Dziech, whose peaches, plums, and apples come from orchards tended by church members at nearby St. Paul. Plan on waiting in line when the Empanadas Aqui food truck rolls up. There’s music by local performers who work for free: Vendors donate produce at the end of the day to keep the artists from starving. May–October: Thursdays, 3–6:30 pm, outdoors at College Hill Presbyterian Church; November–April: Thursdays, 3–6:30 pm, outdoors at College Hill Presbyterian Church, collegehillfarmmarket.org

 

South
Boone County Farmers’ Market
Slogging through the post-dawn crowds thick with precious pets and cumbersome double strollers at urban markets can leave even the coolest cucumber feeling harried. Luckily, Boone County Farmers’ Market operates at a more pastoral pace—sleep in, then stroll through the quaint collective that features longtime farmers and first-time vendors with products exclusively from Northern Kentucky. Snag fresh veggies or hardy perennials from Kinman Farms, a Burlington institution since 1946, then fill up on one of the jams—blackberry, apple pie, and mint julep are particularly tasty—from Harmony Acres Farm. Jazz up your brats and wieners with zucchini relish, far superior to its sweet pickle contemporary, made by Sweet Virginia’s Homemade Treats, a mother-daughter operation based in Warsaw. While faithful regulars sell daily, visit on the weekend for the full range of purveyors. May–October: Seven days, 9 am–6 pm, Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, boonecountyfarmersmarket.org

 

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