Top 5 Art Exhibits This Week

Top 5 Art Exhibits This Week
Chiyo Mitsuhisa (Attr., Active circa 1532–55) 千代光久 'Presentation of a Prince'; Momoyama period (1573–1615), Late 16th or early 17th century; Six-fold screen Ink, color, and gold on paper; The Thoms Collection; Given by Mrs. Murat H. Davidson in Honor of her Grandfather, Joseph C. Thoms; 1982.6

via Cincinnati Art Museum

It’s a great week for art, from ancient Japanese painted screens to one artist’s “delicate fall of paint.”

1. Masterpieces of Japanese Art
The Cincinnati Art Museum is showing off around 100 Japanese masterpieces from their collection, many of which have rarely been on view. With items ranging from the 12th to 20th century, the mix of paintings, screens, prints, ceramics, armor, and textiles represent masterful works of a wide span of styles and regional perspectives. Through Aug. 30. 953 Eden Park Drive, Mt. Adams, cincinnatiartmuseum.org

2. Eight is Not Enough
In celebration of their eighth year on Main Street, Art Beyond Boundaries is hosting Eight is Not Enough, an exhibit of paintings, sculptures, and photography by local and regional artists. Open to the public Feb. 27 through March 6. Art Beyond Boundaries, 1410 Main St, Over-The-Rhine, artbeyondboundaries.com

3. Works on Paper and Pop-Out-Painting
This double exhibit features Works on Paper, a collection of works by local artists studying at Manifest Drawing Center, and Pop-Out-Painting, a collaborative project among local artists involving die cut paper made into a workable 3D canvas. Through Feb. 27. Brazee Street Studios, Gallery one one, 4426 Brazee St., Oakley, brazeestreetstudios.com

4. Liquid Light
Liquid Light highlights the contemporary art of Joseph Marioni, a Cincinnati-born and New York-based painter known for radiant colors used in a “delicate fall of paint.” Through April 12. DAAP Reed Gallery, University of Cincinnati, Clifton, daap.uc.edu/galleries/reed_gallery.html

5. East Meets West: Fusion of Japanese and Western Art
Frank Satogata melds the natural brush stroke style of Japanese calligraphy with the West’s abstract expressionism movement, sometimes just by posing works side by side (but also by creating works that directly fuse the styles). Through Feb. 28. Kennedy Heights Arts Center, 6546 Montgomery Rd., Kennedy Heights, kennedyarts.org

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