Editor’s Letter, January 2023: The Top Doctors in Cincinnati

Our list can connect you to doctors who will help you stay healthy and propel you off of the couch to seek the care you deserve.
676

A business executive who was new to town asked me recently how I’d describe Cincinnati Magazine in one word, and I answered with “engaging.” Our stories, design, social media presence, and events inform, entertain, and connect people across the region—engaging them with insight into the Cincinnati we know and love. We also try to entice people off of their couches and into the city’s restaurants, museums, bakeries, shops, parks, voting booths, and karaoke bars—to get them actively engaged in their community.

Illustration by Lars Leetaru

I don’t think I was picturing this month’s issue during that conversation, but I should have been. The January Top Doctors feature is a huge undertaking that starts with a survey of every M.D. and D.O. in the region asking them who they’d turn to for medical services (other than themselves) and vetting the highest vote-getters with medical boards in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. We then organize the top doctors into specialty care categories. Along with the final list of 869 doctors, Associate Editor Lauren Fisher curates a half dozen interviews with area medical professionals on trending topics like adolescent mental health and maternal care in the post-Roe world.

Top Doctors is one of our best-selling issues every year, partially because the list is updated every year. Maybe you’re a fresh arrival in Cincinnati, like my new business friend, or maybe you just had a baby and need pediatrician recommendations. Maybe you want a second (or fourth) opinion on your headaches. Maybe your health network changed because your employer switched insurance coverage. This section can connect you to doctors who will help you stay healthy and propel you off of the couch to seek the care you deserve.

Other stories in this issue explore the value of community connections, from the interview with Jill and Ron Plush, who are finding purpose in their son Kyle’s death by helping 911 dispatchers do a better job, to memories of the defunct Sudsy Malone’s, a tribute to neighborhood music venues everywhere. Make connections, and make a difference!

Facebook Comments