Traditional Comforts: A Former Hunting Lodge and the Memories Inside

Art and antiques are the vernacular when it comes to the design language of this 1937 Indian Hill house, which began its life as a Tudor-style hunting lodge. Its rustic, Old Country elegance turns quirky at will, with unexpected steps, alcoves, and passageways—even a wide catwalk outside the children’s bedrooms that overlooks the great room.

YEAR BUILT: 1937 ARCHITECTURAL STYLE: English Tudor ARCHITECTS: John Henry Deekin (1937), Daniel Brooks (1982) INTERIOR DESIGN: Douglas Greiwe, ASID, president of Greiwe Interiors, Inc. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: Jeff Bossman
YEAR BUILT: 1937 ARCHITECTURAL STYLE: English Tudor ARCHITECTS: John Henry Deekin (1937), Daniel Brooks (1982) INTERIOR DESIGN: Douglas Greiwe, ASID, president of Greiwe Interiors, Inc. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: Jeff Bossman

Photograph by J. Miles Wolf.

Exceptionally large interior spaces offered a challenge. Project designer Doug Greiwe, ASID, of Greiwe Interiors met the task head on by carving out dedicated spaces, such as a dining area, as well as creating a style that still held the charm of the home’s original era in a formal, yet slightly relaxed, way.

A generously sized great room, the sitting room, and now the living/family room (with fireplace, tavern-like bar and additional dining table) offer space to socialize. A hand-carved fireplace mantel is the result of many skilled hours logged, along with the wet bar with its English hand-carved panels and polished granite top. “The fun of traditional design,” Greiwe explains, “is combining things that you find interesting to create a sufficient need for nothing more.”
A generously sized great room, the sitting room, and now the living/family room (with fireplace, tavern-like bar and additional dining table) offer space to socialize. A hand-carved fireplace mantel is the result of many skilled hours logged, along with the wet bar with its English hand-carved panels and polished granite top. “The fun of traditional design,” Greiwe explains, “is combining things that you find interesting to create a sufficient need for nothing more.”

Photograph by J. Miles Wolf

Greiwe and the client conveyed that style through a collection of vintage and antique pieces from around the globe. “Along with a few whimsical touches, we were able to create our vision for the family home,” he explains.

Years of travel and seeking out distinctive work by expert artisans uncovered furniture, art, and accessories. On a buying trip to southern France, Greiwe and his client discovered an early 18th century hand-carved buffet offered by a 90-year-old dealer who was selling off beloved family heirlooms. On another trip, the client found a fabulous multi-colored tribal door in Istanbul, which was made into a coffee table for the family room. Therein lies the primary secret of successful traditional design—take your time to wait for the right pieces to show up, and let them serve as meaningful reminders of life’s experiences.

“Be unpredictable,” Greiwe adds. “Don’t be afraid to be eclectic. Select interesting and beautifully designed pieces that will patina nicely over time. A well-designed room should be accomplished gradually with a sensitivity to design, scale, and proportion.”

The former owner who added this showstopper of an observatory was obviously a stargazer who wanted everyone to be curious about what lay behind door number two. The answer: a staircase leading to a high-powered telescope. Those more intrigued by the interior view can still admire the craftsmanship behind the intricately carved walnut door.
The former owner who added this showstopper of an observatory was obviously a stargazer who wanted everyone to be curious about what lay behind door number two. The answer: a staircase leading to a high-powered telescope. Those more intrigued by the interior view can still admire the craftsmanship behind the intricately carved walnut door.

Photograph by J. Miles Wolf.

Timeless Design A swimming pool with striped chaises and a whirlpool offer opportunities for exercise and relaxation. Blue and gray slate surrounds, walkways, and patios hug the Tudor’s exterior, with plenty of defined areas for sitting or lounging. ely carved walnut door. Lush greenery surrounds the seven-acre estate on all sides offering privacy. Colorful flower beds and bronze figurative sculptures by Glenna Goodacre exude beauty and a playful air.
A swimming pool with striped chaises and a whirlpool offer opportunities for exercise and relaxation. Blue and gray slate surrounds, walkways, and patios hug the Tudor’s exterior, with plenty of defined areas for sitting or lounging. Lush greenery surrounds the seven-acre estate on all sides offering privacy. Colorful flower beds and bronze figurative sculptures by Glenna Goodacre exude beauty and a playful air.

Photograph by J. Miles Wolf.

Originally published in Cincinnati Home 2015.

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