This Seven Hills Schoolteacher Is Attempting To Make American History

This summer, Bryce Carlson will depart Newfoundland with his sights set on docking in England—a feat no American has ever accomplished.

Photograph courtesy Bryce Carlson

Years of running extreme marathons and conducting research on human endurance left Mt. Adams resident Bryce Carlson craving his next challenge. This summer, Carlson, a teacher at Seven Hills School, will attempt an unsupported, solo row across the Atlantic Ocean on his custom-made boat, Lucille. He’ll depart Newfoundland with his sights set on docking in England—a feat no American has ever accomplished.

By the time Carlson (hopefully!) reaches land in England, he will have covered 2,000 to 2,500 miles—which he estimates could take 500,000 strokes. He plans to row 12 to 15 hours per 24-hour period. “If I get [lucky] avoiding major storms, I expect to finish in around 50 to 60 days.”


Carlson dedicated his personal savings and credit to finance Lucille, in addition to friend and family support. He hopes to gain additional funding from local sponsors.

Photograph courtesy Bryce Carlson


His navigation equipment includes a chart plotter that he’ll use to program his route. He’ll also be carrying a tracking device that will allow anyone to track his location in real time.

Lucille—its hull made of carbon fiber—has a secure cabin Carlson will inhabit during high winds and big waves. An Automatic Identification System device will sound an alarm if Carlson is on a collision course with another boat.

Photograph courtesy Bryce Carlson


To avoid the added weight of onboard stored liquids, Carlson will use a desalinator, a reverse osmosis device, to turn the salty ocean around him into drinkable water.

Lucille is decorated with three solar panels that “provide the electricity that runs the navigation equipment, desalinator, radar [enhancement], VHF radio, and auto-helm.”

Photograph courtesy Bryce Carlson


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