Hidden Cincy: 51 Secret Haunts, Insider Deals, and Private Places

Quirky museums! Friendly wolves! $1 concessions at Reds games! A sneak peek into 1968! We’ve scoped out 51 of this city’s best-kept secrets. Now they can be revealed.
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Photo Illustration by Jeremy Kramer


Hidden In Plain Sight

Charley Harper Murals at Duke Energy Convention Center → These twin murals aren’t hidden, per se. But they sure used to be. It was 1970, and the entire country was basking in the glow of the Apollo 11 moon landing. The three-year-old Duke Energy Convention Center—then the Convention-Exposition Center—commissioned local illustrator and art superstar-to-be Charley Harper to create two celebratory mosaics for the entryway. The result was Space Walk, a color study in an abstract geometric design. But when the convention center underwent its 1987 renovation, someone thought it would be a great idea to cover up the murals with drywall. They were unveiled in late 2015 and sit proudly in their original location. duke-energycenter.com

Charley Harper Murals at Duke Energy Convention Center
Charley Harper Murals at Duke Energy Convention Center

Photograph by Jeremy Kramer

Dillard’s Clearance Centers → From the outside, these look like regular Dillard’s department stores. But once you enter the Eastgate Mall and West Town Center locations, you quickly realize you’re in a different land, one where everything from clothing for the family to home goods is marked at least 60 percent off, and where weekly specials can knock off even more (when we visited in mid-December, women’s dresses were an additional 60 percent off). Check the websites before you go: Deals are often (but not always—we’re looking at you, Eastgate) posted on each store’s page. Also, practice good fitting-room etiquette and abide by the six-item maximum. Happy hunting! dillards.com

Shifrah Cincinnati → Feeling iffy about church? Shifrah Cincinnati is a low-impact way to wade in. Organized by downtown’s Christ Church Cathedral and held at The Monastery Studio in Walnut Hills, Shifrah is equal parts mass, mediation, and music. Canon Rob Rhodes leads a sermon and Eucharist (“designed for people who don’t like church”), and musicians Ric Hordinski (proprietor of The Monastery) and Kim Taylor perform original arrangements set to ancient texts. The main elements of Shifrah, though, are darkness and candlelight. “That creates space for silence and contemplation,” Rhodes says. “The church’s power is fading, and I see that as an opportunity to be the church that it was in the first centuries—to see what that might look today.” shifrahcincinnati.com

Carew Tower Observation Deck → The binocular viewers at the Carew Tower Observation Deck will help you get a clearer picture of Greater Cincinnati, whichever way you point them.

Carew Tower Observation Deck

Photograph by Jeremy Kramer

Costco Hot Dog → You don’t have to be a suburban soccer mom to know that one of the best-kept lunch secrets around the 275 loop is from Seattle-based warehouse club Costco. Pick up their quarter pound all-beef dog—it packs a mighty 550 calories, sans bun and toppings (don’t miss the crank-cut onions) and along with a beverage, costs a paltry $1.50. Costco has maintained that price for 30 years, and the Springdale store alone sells an average of 1,000 wieners each week. Somebody knows how to cut the mustard. costco.com

Goebel Goats → Sometimes park-improvement brainstorms result in live music. But sometimes, they result in live goats instead. At least that’s how 10 came to take up residence in Covington’s Goebel Park, where you can spot ’em doing their adorable goat thing in a nearly two-acre wooded enclosure. Their benefit is environmental and social, says Gus Wolf, the brains behind the operation: They chomp down weeds and other hard-to-control invasive species, in the process clearing a top-to-bottom line of sight that has helped eradicate some, um, less desirable uses of the park. The goats are wintering on Wolf’s farm in Carroll County, but look for them to be back and baaaa-ing in May. facebook.com/goebelgoats

Goebel Goats
Goebel Goats

Photograph courtesy Lauren DiFulvio

Five Points Biergarten → In early 2013, an unassuming alley just off of Peebles Corner was totally overrun with old tires and weeds. Then dozens of neighborhood volunteers spent a Saturday clearing it out, and a biergarten was born. Ever since, the Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation has hosted monthly (seasonal) pop-ups with local breweries like Listermann and MadTree providing the suds, and with live music frequently giving it some soul. This fall, the alleyway stepped up its game with some permanent upgrades—landscaping, lighting, stone pavers—that will make it more of a long-lasting neighborhood fixture, but never change its laid-back spirit. Enter through Angst Coffeehouse & Pub, fivepointswh.com

Hollow Earth → Monument People make pilgrimages to this spot. Yes, really. In the 1880s war hero John Symmes (nephew of John Cleves Symmes, namesake of Symmes Township) dreamed that the earth was hollow, and spent the rest of his life lecturing on his vision of a globe with holes leading to an inner world at each pole. The dream lives on, at least at the spot of this doughnut-shaped monument to the idea that the earth is, like a doughnut, a giant O. Symmes Park Playground, Hamilton

Hollow Earth
Hollow Earth

Illustration by Jonathan Bartlett

Meier’s Wine Cellars → Meier’s Wine Cellars, Ohio’s oldest and largest winery, has been in business since 1890, when founder John Michael Meier grew grapes on land that would one day be home to Kenwood Towne Centre. Today, his namesake business lives on, producing more than 45 wines and non-alcoholic juices. At the winery’s tasting room, you can sample up to 10 of the 53 products on offer, then pick up a bottle to take home at the adjacent store. Sweet wine lovers will find plenty to love, including their port and cream sherry. Like your wine dry? Try the Reièm Brut sparkling wine. It’s light, slightly fruity, and crisp. meierswinecellars.com

 


Look A Little Closer

Mariemont Carillon → Dedicated in 1929 to the youth of the village, the Mary M. Emery Memorial Carillon is an instrument composed of 49 bells that honors the founder of this east side suburb. Renovated in 2008, the carillon is one of only 180 in North America and is one of only a handful housed in a park setting. Regular recitals (Sundays and principal holidays) are given by esteemed carillonneurs Richard Gegner and Richard Watson, whose repertoire ranges from English folk songs and American spirituals to classical pieces (Bach, Handel). Tours of the carillon—including the keyboard area as well as a trip up to touch the actual bells—are available after concerts and upon request with advance notice. mariemont.com/carillon-concerts

Mariemont Carillon
Mariemont Carillon

Photograph courtesy Joe Stoner

Listermann Brewing’s Fermatorium → Listermann head brewer Patrick Gilroy and crew have taken on the age-old art of fermentation. They’re exploring everything esoteric—from pulque to mead—as well as traditional patio pounders like alcoholic cider, chardonnay, and pinot noir. Gilroy started by experimenting with home fermentation (kits are available for purchase in the onsite shop) and now sources ingredients from across the country. Initial production levels are kept small, and you can taste the results in their taproom. “That’s how we started here and we’ll grow as we can,” says Gilroy. “I’m looking forward to moving through different styles to see what works.” So are we. listermannbrewing.com

UC Equestrian Team → In 2007, the University of Cincinnati Equestrian Team had dwindled to just eight participants and were bottom feeders in their Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association zone. Enter Missy Jo Hollingsworth, an award-winning trainer and owner of Saddle Lake Equestrian Center in Camp Springs, Kentucky. The program has blossomed thanks to her wealth of experience—she teaches both English and Western style—and now features 50 riders of varying experience levels that train across 20 acres. Now, the team regularly competes in the IHSA Nationals, following one of Hollingsworth’s many positive maxims: “Whatever you do, be great at it.” ucequestrianteam.com

Mitchell Memorial Forest → Mitchell Memorial Forest is one of those west side gems that Cincinnati left-coasters are happy to keep to themselves. The nature trail, playground, picnic area, and jogging track surrounding a catch-and-release fishing pond tick off all of the ideal local park boxes, and on any given day, you’re likely to come across as many humans as you are deer. But what truly sets it apart is the eight-mile, International Mountain Biking Association-approved trail, the first official one in Hamilton County. Finished in 2012, it was constructed with help from the Cincinnati Off Road Alliance and features a mixture of moderate and steep terrain and technical features. Grease up that gear chain and head west. greatparks.org

The Party Source Spirits Library Among the many wonders to be found at The Party Source (Fancy cheese! Bachelorette party accessories! Wee bottles of bourbon! Pre-filled growlers to go!) is the Spirits Library. Just past the cigar room, right around the corner from the 24 new taps at the growler fill and canning station, are cabinets filled with spirits of all sorts—and you can sample them. Pricing and selections will vary, but this is a great opportunity to get a little sip of the very highest-shelf liquors before you invest in a bottle. thepartysource.com

Miles of Golf → Sure, it was the poor grip on your nine iron. That’s why you lofted your approach into the drink. Stop by Miles of Golf in Fairfield and you can eliminate that excuse from your list. The shop offers fitting for every club and lessons through the Spencer Golf Academy so you know how to use them. Afterwards, drown your frustrations (or celebrate success!) at the Stockton Beer Garden, a seasonal outdoor patio with a menu of brats and cans of local brews—the perfect athletic fuel. milesofgolf.com/cincinnati

Taste of India Festival → Check out the raucous sub-continental swagger on display at the Hindu Temple of Greater Cincinnati’s Taste of India on September 10. The Naach Sitare dance competitions are intense, the bhangra beats infective, and the sultry-spiced curries, dosas, and chaat snacks are highly addictive. Don’t miss the chance to step inside the Summerside temple itself (shoes off, please!) and observe the majestic history of Hindu decorative arts. Pro Tip: Go later in the day and stay for the Rozzi fireworks. tasteofindiacincinnati.com

Newberry Brothers Coffee and Prohibition Bourbon Bar → During prohibition, it would not be out of the question to wander into the back of your local bakery or drugstore and find a hidden space where the 18th amendment was flouted. That’s the kind of atmosphere Peter and Kim Newberry were hoping to re-create at Prohibition Bourbon Bar, tucked in the back of their Newport coffee shop. Come around a corner and you see a glow from over 700 bottles of Kentucky’s finest export. We even spotted a bottle of so-rare-it-might-as-well-be-a-unicorn Hirsch bourbon. But the joy of this place isn’t in the super-rare bottles—it’s in trying something new, sharing a laugh with the fiercely supportive neighborhood regulars, and enjoying the fruits of the 21st amendment in this historic space. newberrybroscoffee.com

Newberry Brothers Coffee and Prohibition Bourbon Bar
Newberry Brothers Coffee and Prohibition Bourbon Bar

Photograph by Jeremy Kramer

Dunlap Café → Breakfast of champions, you say? Get it all day at Dunlap Café, just up from Findlay Market. It’s the best kind of old school: tin ceilings, a wall of more than 500 historic beer cans (we spotted an original special edition Hu-Dey Hudy can), and a breakfast hearty enough to put you right back to sleep for $4.99. The pancakes are dense and delicious; the light, whipped butter could (dare we say should?) be eaten with a spoon; and that doesn’t even touch on the burger-filled lunch menu. Which you should most certainly wash down with $3 cans of Rhinegeist beer—yes, half the price you’d pay in the room where it’s brewed just down the street. (513) 721-0704

Campbell County Library’s Touch Tone Tales → Maybe kids can’t tune in to, like, the Little Orphan Annie radio hour anymore. But they can call up Campbell County Library for a new story each week, read by Charlie “The Noise Guy” Williams. He does all the voices and sounds, so it feels a lot like an old-timey radio show. In one send-up of A Prairie Home Companion, a fake Garrison Keillor reads “Flush: An Ode to Toilet” (yes, The Noise Guy makes all the whooshing water sounds). It’s four minutes of unmitigated silliness, which is apparently something we all need a little more of: Last year, the line took more than 18,000 calls. (859) 572-5039

Secret Garden Tour → Each June, the Cincinnati Horticultural Society loads 120 to 140 people on buses and sends them off on a day-long tour of local gardens. And not one of those people (who’ve each dropped $100 on a ticket) know where they’re going. “They just sign up on faith,” says Frank Welsh, a CHS board member. The society is able to gain access to fantastic outdoor spaces because they promise anonymity to homeowners. Tours start with a continental breakfast, break for lunch (last year, at Kenwood Country Club), then wrap up in the afternoon. No word on where this year’s tour might be, but you can get on the mailing list at the CHS website. cincinnatihorticulturalsociety.com

Secret Garden Tour
Secret Garden Tour

Illustration by Jonathan Bartlett

Liberty Garden in Eden Park → A switchback-style paved path, intermittently engraved with quotes (Lady Bird Johnson! the Magna Carta!), winds up a small hill to a garden in the shadow of the Eden Park water tower. With sculptures dedicated to each of the four freedoms described in FDR’s famous 1941 speech (of speech and expression; to worship; from want; from fear), the garden was constructed as a local memorial to 9/11 but can be a more globally meditative space. Just take the final H. Jackson Brown Jr. quote, cut in stone: “Remember that everyone you meet is afraid of something, loves something, and has lost something.” Alpine Place at St. Paul Dr., Walnut Hills

Moriah Pie → Plenty of restaurants have unique business models. But we’ve never found one with a setup quite like this. Named for Mt. Moriah—the Old Testament spot where Abraham took Isaac to sacrifice, saying “God will provide”—this Friday-only, by-the-slice pizza joint (in the former Speckled Bird Café) is pay-as-you’re-able, so anyone has the means to partake in the rotating specialty pizzas, desserts, soups, and salads. But the mission stands not in the way of taste. It’s fresh, it’s good—most of the ingredients are grown in their garden—and it’s BYOB. Just remember: If you can, pay generously. God is watching. Fridays 4:30–9:30 pm, 1766 Mills Ave., Norwood

Great American Ball Park → Let’s face it: The Cincinnati Reds aren’t gonna be very good this season. But that doesn’t mean a day at the ballpark has to be a painful, expensive trip. The Reds have always made an effort to enhance the fan experience, including special all-you-can-eat tickets and the kept-on-the-down-low $1 concession stand—hot dogs, peanuts, soda, ice cream—which has been located along the upper deck of the right field line the past few seasons. The Reds even allow fans to bring outside food and soft-sided coolers into the stadium with them, which is reason enough to root for the home team. reds.com

Sushi Cincinnati → With windows obscured by dark blinds and no discernible street signage, you’d be forgiven for zooming past Sushi Cincinnati. But inside the nondescript Covington HQ is a date-night-ready class that will turn an amateur cook into a seasoned itamae in under an hour. The briskly paced lesson comes with kitschy fun—a gong rings in the beginning of the lesson—and instructors who honed their craft in Southeast Asia. The Saturday evening events require reservations, but walk-ins are welcome to try after 7 p.m.  sushicinti.com

Glendalia Boutique Hotel and Culinary Studio Feeling intimidated by fresh pasta? Always wanted to roast a chicken under the nonjudgmental gaze of a trained chef? Book a kitchen party at this micro-hotel in historic Glendale, housed in a former grocery store. Bring your own beverages (read: wine) and let the kindly instructors demystify the finer points of rolling gnocchi, making short pastry, and using French herbs. When the cooking is done, they’ll plate your meal and serve it restaurant-style at the communal table. The surrounding village is off-the-charts cute; book a room (or an Uber) if you want to make a night of it at the nearby Piccolo Wine Room. theglendalia.com

Lawn Bowling at Little Miami Golf Center → Born out of what we can only assume was a frustration with putting and a disdain for smoky bowling alleys, lawn bowling has a rep as your grandpa’s sport. But that doesn’t mean it’s not a good time. Try your hand at the game—basically a more structured version of bocce on a glorified putting green—at the Little Miami Golf Center. The first two visits are free and you’ll even get a lesson from members of the Cincinnati Lawn Bowling Club, founded in 1922. (513) 562-5650

 


On Lockdown

Wolf Creek Habitat & Rescue → Yes, you get to play with wolves. But beware: These wild, massive, powerful beasts of nature will slobber all over your face and paw at you incessantly until you rub their belly in just the right spot. Terry and Kathy Baudendistel started Wolf Creek Habitat & Rescue in 1989 because they loved wolves and had the land; in 2005, they started letting people visit and observe the wolves (free of charge), and by 2011 were allowing visitors a chance to interact with them ($30). Kathy supervises and makes sure you stay safe, but you quickly realize how friendly these animals are. There’s even a tipi you can rent for the night, in case you’re struck by an urge to howl at the moon. wolfcreekhabitat.org

Wolf Creek Habitat & Rescue
Wolf Creek Habitat & Rescue

Photographs by Jeremy Kramer

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Oasis Russian Fusion Dance Party → What’s better than potato dumplings? Potato dumplings and ’90s club music, that’s what. Don’t be fooled by the suburban strip mall storefront: Oasis Russian Fusion has a solid menu of Baltic classics and an awesomely random dance party every Saturday night. Throw down on some lamb kebabs, beef stroganoff, and cheese-filled pastry, then dance your cares (and calories) away with the house DJ. oasisrussianfusion.com

Oasis Russian Fusion Dance Party
Oasis Russian Fusion Dance Party

Illustration by Jonathan Bartlett

Plum Court Wine Room → On the southeast corner of Plum and Court Streets you’ll find a tidy-but-blank facade—the only hint of life is a bunch of grapes hand-painted on the door. But on the other side is a cozy wine bar with leather couches and antique glass-fronted bookshelves filled with bottles. Tom and Dollie Moore quietly opened shop in 2010, offering paired wine tastings Friday nights only, 6–8:30 pm. “Paired” means there’s food prepared to match with each wine (plus recipe print-outs for you to take.) It’s as relaxing as drinking in your living room, only with better snacks. $15 for four wines plus food, $20 for six; call other days for retail bottle purchase. facebook.com/plumcourt.wineroom

Cincinnati: 1968 → Take a tour of a familiar yet nearly unrecognizable city: downtown Cincinnati in 1968. The 554 black and white photos (discovered in 2014, after an employee in the Hamilton County Auditor’s office retired) were taken as part of the 1969 property appraisal process. It’s a bit disorienting, this peek at a time when the Fifth Third tower is under construction and buildings slated for demolition wear “View of Tomorrow” placards touting the changes to come. But some stalwarts remain: City Hall, House of Adam, Scotti’s. There’s a link to the full collection on the auditor’s home page, and individual images are linked to existing parcels through the image tab of the parcel record. hamiltoncountyauditor.org/vintagephotos.asp

Lloyd Library→ There are worlds within the shell of this nondescript downtown building, one of the greatest private libraries in the country. Tens of thousands of books and journals of botany, herbology, and far more mystical ideas, reaching back centuries. All a testimony to the far-sighted Lloyds, by far among the most interesting of Cincinnati families. lloydlibrary.org

The National Flag Company → When the Bengals needed the French flag to carry onto the field last November, they called Art Schaller Jr. Schaller is president of The National Flag Company, a Cincinnati institution since 1869. Located in a three-story red brick factory in the West End, the wholesale operation delivers over a million flags across the country but still relies on old-school technique. A 110-year-old Huber letter press churns out prints three days a week while sewers delicately stitch patterns onto flags up to 50 feet wide. As for Old Glory, you can bet your bald eagle it’s still the most popular, with more than 500,000 American flags sold in 2015 alone. thenationalflagcompany.com

The National Flag Company
The National Flag Company

Photographs by Jeremy Kramer

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Lindner Park McCullough Estate  Nature Preserve → The Lindner Park McCullough Estate Nature Preserve isabout as hidden as a public park can get, buried in a nondescript Norwood subdivision and obscured by what looks like a private residence from the road. It makes the discovery feel like a revelation, and one you’re certain to return to. Pack a lunch for a romantic, secluded picnic date; bring the kids and the dog along to trek the easy but picturesque walking trails; or keep it a secret and let it be yours. Cypress Way, Norwood

Tri-State WarBird Museum →  This top-notch historical aviation museum is designed to excite both young and old with exhibits, memorabilia, and lovingly restored  WWII-vintage aircraft on site. Don’t miss the Rolls Royce liquid-cooled engine on display. It powered a P-51 Mustang named Cincinnati Miss, a single-seat fighter plane that reached 437 mph with a combat range of 1,000 miles. Or peek inside the Grumman TBM-3 Avenger, a plane that played a major role in sinking more than 60 Imperial Japanese Navy ships after the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Volunteer tour guides are passionate and highly knowledgeable about both history and technology. Plan ahead: The museum is only open on Wednesdays 4–7 and Saturdays 10–3. tri-statewarbirdmuseum.org

NKU Bass Fishing team → “When most people look at colleges, they go to schools for academics,” says Brandon Knapmeyer. “I was looking at how good the school was for fishing.” Knapmeyer chose to stay close to home at Northern Kentucky University, in large part because his best friend, Brandon Houston, had recently cofounded the school’s bass fishing club team. Knapmeyer’s decision proved wise a few years later when he and Houston won the 10th Anniversary BoatUS Collegiate Bass Fishing Championship last spring on Pickwick Lake in Florence, Alabama, beating out more than 160 competing universities—most of which field teams three times the size of NKU’s squad. “If an Alabama team wins that tournament, they’re throwing a parade for them,” says Knapmeyer. “That’s how big a deal it is.”

 


Club Life

“We’re very open-minded,” says University Club president Jim Singler. “We like new people. If someone would like to join, I’d love to talk to them.” The YP crowd will find steeply reduced annual rates ($575 under 30, $999 ages 30–34), plus lowered initiation fees. uclubcincinnati.com

For young adults (ages 21–40), historic Cincinnati Tennis Club reduces its annual fee to $475 and waives the initiation fee. Apply to join and get court use and cardio tennis classes (sans reservations or extra fees), social events, and more. Tennis whites are a must. cincinnatitennisclub.com

It’s a literal boys club (women are only allowed in the restaurant and adjoining yoga studio), but Cincinnati Athletic Club is a downtown gem—hell, there’s a marble swimming pool. Annual membership runs $855 for ages 21–29 and $1,495 for ages 30–37 after a discount.  cac1853.com

 


Eat-And-Drink Deals

Tuesdays are two-fers at Servatii—two of their signature pretzels are $2—but don’t overlook the grab-and-go lunches. A scoop of chicken salad goes for $3.50; a slice of quiche—with fruit salad and cookies—will set you back a cool $4.75. In, out, done. servatii.com

Downtown’s Horse & Barrel offers a happy hour deal that can’t be beat: An Old and a Cold. For $5, you get a one-ounce pour of Old Grand-Dad, Old Forrester, Old Crow, or Old Overholt rye paired with a pint of draft beer (rotating, mostly local). Cheers! horseandbarrelcincy.com

Think there’s something wrong with half-price sushi? Think again. On Tuesdays, Miyako serves up half-price (but full quality) rolls in a revamped Bob Evans off the Buttermilk Pike exit. miyakorestaurant.com

Miyako
Miyako

Photograph by Jeremy Kramer


Beer Bonuses

William Becker, owner of Eastside Hydroponics, opened Fresh Beer in the same Ohio Pike strip mall

in May. We like his all-craft, mostly-local focus. He uses a PEGAS growler filler—it’s fast and foam-free. (Pro tip: Bring a glass growler if you want to try it.) freshbeercincinnati.com

With eight taps, a cooler full of build-your-own-six-pack options, and a respectable craft beer selection, Biermarkt is a west side gem. Thursday is pint night, featuring local and craft brews. biermarktusa.com

In a strip mall just inside a Florence subdivision, Holler Hops and Grill (large craft beer selection, streamlined menu) is supported by a host of nearby residents: Nearly every person who enters is greeted by name (or nickname). It’s enough to make you want to become a regular. facebook.com/HollerHopsandGrill

 


Sub-Rosa Museums

Hey look, Greek treasures and more in the middle of a forest! At Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park, there’s a little museum with an Egyptian sarcophagus, terra cotta sculptures, coins, all kinds of stuff—plus those large-scale works overlooking the Great Miami River. pyramidhill.org

The Skirball Museum (on the campus of Hebrew Union College) was recently gifted a massive donation of artistic and cultural heritage that triples its size. A figurine of Sandy Koufax! Rembrandt etchings! This is the best attic ever. huc.edu

The Lucky Cat Museum inside Essex Studios has more examples of the Japanese maneki neko, that paw up, good-luck-bringing antecedent to Hello Kitty, than you probably knew existed. Clocks, cushions, Asian tchotkes galore. By appointment only: manekinekomuseum@yahoo.com or call/text (513) 633-3923

The Lucky Cat Museum
The Lucky Cat Museum

Photograph by Jeremy Kramer

 


Invisible Venues

Come for the coffee, stay for the up-and-coming folk singers you need to hear. The Folk School Coffee Parlor has been presenting the live recording of the new Jerry Springer podcast (“tales, tunes, tomfoolery,” they say). Is Ludlow, Kentucky, becoming the Lake Wobegone of the 21st century?  folkschoolcoffeeparlor.com

That room you’ve heard the music bleeding out of above Cincy by the Slice in OTR? It’s Maudie’s. Say yes to pickles on pizza, with a side of local bands rocking out. facebook.com/Maudies

Comfortable chairs and couches, meaningful singer-songwriters—DownTowne Listening Room is exactly like being at a great house concert but in a defunct Art Deco department store (the old Shillito building). Like a private show in a fancy tomb. downtownelisteningroom.com

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